Saturday, November 2, 2013

Lefse!

I'm half norwegian.  My mom's parents are first generation canadians and so grew up with many scandinavian foods and traditions.  Until recently I hadn't really thought much about my heritage, but as I've paid more attention, through reading books and asking questions of family members, I've realized that norwegian-american culture has definitely helped shape who I am!

Things I've Noted:

I like to say that coffee drinking is in my blood--
putting on the coffee and pulling out cookies when company arrive is very scandinavian.

I love fish and dairy of all kinds, both integral to scandinavian cuisine;
I seem to have missed out on the potato loving gene, though...

The yuletide tradition of a buffet meal with meats, cheeses, pickles of all sorts, rolls, sweets, and all manner of rich foods is very familiar to me.

And most of all, I appreciate the hard-working, stoic, faithful family legacy I have been given.


Last trip up to visit family included Lefse-making with my great aunt and my sister.  Aunt Mildred learned to make lefse from her mother and it was a real treat to get to make it with her.  Lefse, for those unfamiliar with the food, is often described as a potato pancake but I think it is really closest to a potato tortilla in shape and texture.

We start with a big bowl of mashed potatoes, made the night before.  Done with milk, butter and salt.
We add flour to make a dough.  No measurements, just "feel"! 

The dough needs to be a consistency to roll out quite thin, without sticking and without breaking apart when transferring to the griddle.

My turn to try rolling.

Not getting any points for roundness!

Aunt Mildred shows us how to use a long stick to move the prepared dough to the griddle.

There's a trick to carrying the lefse,

and turning it over, sort of rolling it off the stick.

Naomi's turn to roll.

I'm using a little cloth to swipe the excess flour from the griddle, so it doesn't burn and stick on the next lefse.

Lefse flipping in action!

Notice the cup of coffee, necessary to accompany any project.

And, finally, enjoying the end result, kept warm in a big pot in the oven as we cooked them one at a time.  Best enjoyed with butter and jam or sugar!

Grandpa likes lefse too!

Crandon trying it for the first time, and our little guy wondering when he gets some!

Yummm!

 

2 comments:

Olinda said...

Yes, I agree it was very good, and perfect with a cup of coffee!

GretchenJoanna said...

It's been about 40 years since I first read a recipe for lefse and put it in my collection. But I've never tried them! However, now that I've seen your pictures and description of the process, it seems very do-able. Thank you!